The first Man Booker prize to admit novels from across the globe as long as they are written in English has published its longlist.
So, what do you think of that? And have you read any of them?
“Dear Noble Idiot,
Okay, I know your full name is Selfless Well-Meaning Sacrifice in Service of One True Love, Esq., but there’s a reason we’ve dubbed you the Noble Idiot. Because as much as nobility is your cause, idiocy is your effect.”

— Javabeans and Girlfriday, Why Do Dramas Do That? Part 1

“It’s no wonder then that what people say to each other as encouragement is: Work hard and do your best, and endure all things! Or, you know, the shorter version: Fighting!”

— Javabeans and Girlfriday, Why Do Dramas Do That? Part 1

“Because he didn’t laugh when he thought something was funny—he laughed when he was happy.”

— Rainbow Rowell, Landline

“Neal didn’t take Georgie’s breath away. Maybe the opposite. But that was okay—that was really good, actually, to be near someone who filled your lungs with air.”

— Rainbow Rowell, Landline

““Eating is the only thing that breaks the monotony,” Scotty said.”

— Rainbow Rowell, Landline

“The perceptive reader might have realized how passionate Anne was, almost from the start of the novel, but until this there was no indication of equal passion in Wentworth. His letter, as befits a naval commander, is badly written and not exactly Austenian, but it is all the more effective thereby. We come to realize that we have believed in him until now only because Anne’s love for him provokes our interest. Austen wisely has declined to make him interesting enough on his own.Yet part of the book’s effect is to persuade the reader of the reader’s own powers of discernment and self-persuasion; Anne Elliot is almost too good for the reader, as she is for Austen herself, but the attentive reader gains the confidence to perceive Anne as she should be perceived. The subtlest element in this subtlest of novelsis the call upon the reader’s own power of memory to match thepersistence and intensity of the yearning that Anne Elliot is too stoical to express directly.”

— Harold Bloom, The Western Canon

“Anne Elliot is hardly the only figure in Austen who has an understanding heart. Her difference is in her almost preternatural acuteness of perception of others and of the self, which are surely the qualities that most distinguish Austen as a novelist.”
“Plato hoped that by banishing the poet, he would also banish the tyrant. Banishing Shakespeare, or rather reducing him to his contexts, will not rid us of our tyrants. In any case, we cannot rid ourselves of Shakespeare, or of the Canon that he centers. Shakespeare, as we like to forget, largely invented us; if you add the rest of the Canon, then Shakespeare and the Canon wholly invented us.”

— Harold Bloom, The Western Canon